The Hailstorm Approach: Prep for Nanowrimo in Seven Days (or Less)

Plan? Ain't no plan!

So you decided to participate in National Novel Writing Month this year. You’ve kicked around a few ideas and sworn to make an outline. Then things got busy. The kid got sick. You just had to find out if Elise was going to get kicked off Hell’s Kitchen. Your World of Warcraft raid group decided they were going to run Firelands without pants. Your muse packed up her stuff, gave you the finger, and knocked over your entire collection of Elvis commemorative plates on the way out the door. Or whatever. Long story short, you’ve burned your time like a Roman candle, Nanowrimo is a week away, and you’ve got nothing. Nothing! What do you do?

All is not lost. It might be a bit late in the game to meticulously plan ahead, but you can still throw something together in time for your inevitable November panic attack. It won’t be perfect, but you don’t want it to be perfect. Perfectionism runs contrary to the very spirit of Nanowrimo. Here, then, is a quick-and-dirty method for outlining that you can pull off in a week or less.

I call this the Hailstorm Approach, which is to say that it’s an extremely stripped-down variant of Randy Ingermanson’s Snowflake Method. (I had considered calling it the Half-Pants Approach, but that sounded kind of dirty.) If you want a proper, useful method of outlining a novel before you write, I highly recommend the Snowflake. But the Snowflake is far more thorough and time-consuming than this, and that’s time you probably don’t have with Nanowrimo only a week away.

If you’re experienced with outlining, then you probably have no need for this. But if you’re a seat-of-the-pants writer or a first-timer looking for a framework for your story, this method might help you get through Nanowrimo with your sanity intact. I broke these steps down into daily tasks, but there’s no rule saying you can’t do it all in one Herculean sitting if you’re that kind of maniac.

So here we go.

1. Pick a Genre, Write a One-Sentence Summary

Before you even start, you have to know what your story’s about. Most likely, you already have this covered; if not, well, here’s your big chance. Don’t worry too much about specifics at this point. Just boil your story down to your “elevator pitch,” the single sentence that sums up the book you want to write. You should also pick the genre(s) for your book. If you want to write a crazy, genre-mashing masterpiece for Nanowrimo, that’s fine, but it’s best if you at least know which genres you’ll be defying from the outset.

2. Better Get a Bucket

Next, make a wishlist of all the stuff you want to write about. Nanowrimo transforms November into a demanding beast, and you may find motivation and inspiration at a premium. So just write down everything you want to put in your book, no matter how off-the-wall or unlikely it might seem. Aim for one simple criterion: if the thought of writing a particular element excites you, put it on the list. You’re under no obligation to include everything on this list when the time comes to write your draft, and you can save the elements you don’t use for a later project.

3. Three Acts, Three Disasters

To keep your novel from meandering, impose a loose three-act structure for the novel. Again, don’t get really exacting about it at this point, just have a rough idea in mind. Ingermanson adds another layer onto this, called the “three-disaster” structure. These are basically three obstacles that you throw in front of your protagonists before the climax of the story:

The Three Disaster Structure says that you have three MAJOR disasters in your story and they are equally spaced. So Disaster 1 comes at the end of the first quarter. Disaster 2 comes right at half-time. Disaster 3 comes at the end of the third quarter.

Once you’ve figured these things out, you’ll have a skeletal framework for your story. This framework will almost certainly change over time and multiple drafts, so don’t sweat it too much. The goal here is not to create a rigid plan that you can’t deviate from — it’s to keep your contemporary political thriller from becoming a sci-fi epic about ninja chimps swordfighting on Mars (unless that’s your one-sentence summary, in which case, good work!)

4. Characters and Aspects

If you’ve been writing for awhile, you’re probably intimately familiar with the many intricate character charts that detail every nuance of a character’s existence. Such a thorough level of detail is probably impractical given the pace and scope of Nanowrimo, so here’s a quick compromise: for each character, come up with a name, then a set of five to ten “aspects” that describe that character. These can be anything: physical descriptors, story goals, personality traits, quotes, character tropes, a list of their diseases… anything you think sums up the characters. Don’t worry about being consistent — just make a quick sketch of each major character.

5. Relationships and Conflicts

Now that you’ve figured out your characters and their roles in the story, it’s time to start tying them together. Carve out some relationships: best friends, lovers, sworn enemies, backstabbing traitors, disapproving parental figures, whatever. If a sketch or a mind-map works better than a bulleted list, do that. Plotting out the major relationships and keeping them in front of you will lend your scenes clarity and drive, especially when characters are working at cross-purposes. Again, this is not a stone tablet to be slavishly devoted to — if you get to writing and you find something’s not working, jettison it without mercy.

6. Create Summaries for Major Characters

At a certain point in the outlining process, the Snowflake Method recommends writing the entire story from the point of view of each character. This presumes that you’ve already written a summary of the story in its entirety, though, and since this method doesn’t include that step, I recommend a slightly different approach.

Write a couple of sentences or a short paragraph describing the story arc for each major character: where they begin, how they change, and where they end up. If you’ve outlined your characters and their relationships in the previous steps, this should be pretty easy pickings. Paint with a broad brush and don’t get hung up on details — there’s plenty of time for that later.

7. Create a Rough Scene List

For the final step, break out a new text file or a spreadsheet and create a list of scenes for your novel, from beginning to end. Include the point-of-view character and a one-sentence summary of what happens in each scene. Again, this is not to be considered immutable law — just a low-level breakdown of the story.

Pick items generously from the wishlist you made above: include everything you find exciting and compelling. Try to add only scenes that move the story forward. One of the big advantages of outlining is that you cut way down on wasted scenes that go nowhere. They’ll probably still crop up during your draft, but there will be far fewer of them.

And that’s it. You now have a nice, messy framework for your Nanowrimo novel, with just enough detail to keep you going, while not detracting from the joy of the first-draft rush.

If by any chance you end up using this method, I’d love to hear about it. Criticisms, recommendations and refinements are equally welcome. Happy Nano-ing this November!

  • Whoa, this is a combination of some hard-core writing methods. Well done! I’m going to bookmark this and spread the love. Maybe even try it!!! Thanks. 🙂

    • My pleasure, Lyn, and thanks for the comment and the love!

  • By using WriteWayPro, As a first time NanoWriter, I have already followed these steps without even realizing it… I LOVE WRITEWAYPRO!!!

  • Amy Paulussen

    I just read up about the snowflake method a few days ago. I had a rough outline and pretty in-depth main character bios, but I took the advice about creating a spreadsheet outlining the scenes: so great! Feeling more prepared than ever. Totally overconfident, but thinking this year is going to be a walk in the park compared to my previous dedicatedly-pantsy novembers.

    • I’m outlining for the first time this year as well. And I think overconfidence is just the right approach!

  • This is a cool compilation of getting things together quickly enough to actually last through more than the first week! haha

    • Thanks, Brittany! If it helps just one person get through that first week, mission accomplished. 🙂

  • Thank you for sharing this list with us! Although I am not in the of needing to prep in less than seven days, I will definitely use some of these steps with the finalizing of my outlines as November approaches! 🙂

    • Hey, whatever helps! Thanks for the comment, Kenon, and good luck this November.

  • Thanks for sharing! And I’m loving the NaNo Writing Calendars that you made. I snagged one for my computer. I’m not sure if it will motivate or stress me out but either way, I appreciate it 🙂

    • Thank you so much, Kristina. I’ll try to turn out some more soothing calendars when November gets closer. 🙂

  • Thanks for sharing! And I’m loving the NaNo Writing Calendars that you made. I snagged one for my computer. I’m not sure if it will motivate or stress me out but either way, I appreciate it 🙂

  • Anonymous

    +1 For “Hailstorm” as an abridged, more agressive Snowflake. 🙂

  • This is great! I’m a first time participant and not big on outlines – I researched and wrote my Master’s thesis in 10 days. I let things ‘percolate’ in my brain and then sit down and write. Don’t know if that method will work for NaNo, but I have your suggestions to fall back on! 🙂

    • That’s great, Ruth. Thanks for the comment, and best of luck to you in November.

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  • Nanolanta writer

    Hi, I can’t believe I waited this long to give you feedback. THANK YOU. This post was so helpful to me. I did my first NaNo this past November, and your hailstorm structure helped me pull together some semblance of an outline and keep track during those exhausting 30 days. I even reached my 50K words! It was such a great experience, my first ever creative endeavor at that.

    • Wow, thank you for the terrific comment. I’m so glad you found it useful! Hope you keep writing all year round 🙂

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  • Paul Vincent

    I’m off to research the “snowflake method” as I’d never heard of it before. I’m doing my first NaNoWriMo this year, but I’m already fully planned out ready to go. Should be fun!

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  • Maddi

    Oh my goodness, this is just wonderful! The outlining process is often tedious and hard for me, but this one is everything I needed without becoming cumbersome or making the writing itself dull. Thanks so much!

  • To Neverland and Back Again

    Thank you! This method is great and you condensed the snowflake method perfectly so it is still super helpful without the over elaboration!